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Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City (In Pictures)

So by now (and based on 4 of my last 5 blog posts), most of you know I spent some time in Mexico City with Mrs. Perez. We decided to make the trip down there when two of my short documentary films were named official selections of Shorts Mexico. Now besides attending the film festival, we found the time to visit a few of the main attractions in Mexico City's Centro Histórico, namely Zócalo, the Museo Nacional de Arte. We also visited Museo Soumaya and drove out to the ruins of the ancient city of Teotihuacán.

So today, allow me to present a collection of photographs (and my last Mexico City post) I took during a visit to the Palacio de Bellas Artes, one of the most prominent cultural centers in Mexico City and home to the Ballet Folklórico de México.

The initial design and construction was undertaken by Italian architect Adamo Boari in 1904, but complications arising from the soft subsoil and the political problem both before and during the Mexican Revolution, hindered then stopped construction completely by 1913. Construction began again in 1932 under Mexican architect Federico Mariscal and was completed in 1934.

Art Nouveau dominates the exterior, which was done by Adamo Boari, and the inside is dominated by Art Deco, which was completed by Federico Mariscal. The building was declared an artistic monument in 1987 by UNESCO and receives an average of 10,000 visitors a week.

The most impressive feature of the Palace are the stunning murals painted by most of the famous names of Mexican muralism: Rufino Tamayo, David Alfaro Siqueiros, José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera. The murals alone are worth the visit.

So if you ever find yourself in Mexico City, a visit to Palacio de Bellas Artes is a must. Should you never find yourself in Mexico City, check out the photographs (and just tell people you were there). Enjoy...

Palacio de Bellas Artes

First of all, the streets outside the Palace on a Saturday afternoon were packed with people...

Palacio de Bellas Artes

Face to face with the Palacio de Bellas Artes. The roof covering the center of the building is made of crystal designed by Hungarian artist Géza Maróti...

Palacio de Bellas Artes

Palacio de Bellas Artes

The interior of the Palace is made up of Carrara marble, Marotti glass and an iron roof...

David Alfaro Siqueiros

"Víctima del fascismo" by controversial Mexican social realist painter David Alfaro Siqueiros

Diego Rivera

Diego Rivera

From a distance and up close: "El Hombre en el Cruce de Caminos" by prominent Mexican painter (and husband of Frida Kahlo) Diego Rivera

Palacio de Bellas Artes

"Nueva democracia", a powerful mural by David Alfaro Siqueiros, was alone worth the visit...

Diego Rivera

"Carnaval de la vida mexicana" by Diego Rivera

David Alfaro Siqueiros

"Apoteosis de Cuauhtémoc" by David Alfaro Siqueiros

Palacio de Bellas Artes

One last look around before we exit...

Palacio de Bellas Artes

Outside the building are several sculptures of cherubs representing music and inspiration...

Palacio de Bellas Artes

Outside, you'll also find several Pegasus sculptures by Agustí Querol Subirats, a prominent Spanish sculptor...

Kidney Transplant

Hope you enjoyed the photographs - also check out my other photosets from my visit to Mexico City: Zócalo, Museo Soumaya, and the ancient ruins of Teotihuacán...

Kidney Transplant

Like us on Facebook and you'll make us really happy; we're not sure why, though, but studies have shown that people who like our facebook page are 37% cooler than people who don't...

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